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Lama Mountain Garden

A way of life founded in community.

Our aim is to live in close relationship to one another, function as much as possible as an extended family -- observing community practices such as mutual aid, table fellowship, and sharing in work, play, and hardship. We will be respectful of boundaries, join together in common work, and be willing to "agree and disagree in love."

A way of life informed by the 12-step recovery movement.

We acknowledge ourselves to be addicts -- victims of affluenza. Despite our professed values of love and peace and justice, we compulsively make choices that are unfair, unjust, and unhealthy for our world. We need serious help, and cannot do it alone.

A way of life inspired by the global "Transition Towns" movement.

Together we craft resilient, community-reliant lifestyles that are energy-lean, local-focused, and time-rich. We construct housing and habits that do not depend upon cheap oil nor the exploitation of people and the environment.

A way of life marked by service.

TiLT members will contribute significant amounts of time to service within the community and to service in the surrounding region. Rather than isolate themselves in a "bubble," members of TiLT live in close proximity to human and environmental need.

A way of life infused with spiritual disciplines, common worship, and seasonal rhythms.

Together and alone, our community will seek to implement ancient Judeo-Christian practices such as wilderness sojourn, personal examen, shared liturgy, prayer, sacred song, seasonal ritual, fasting, spiritual direction, open table fellowship, and Sabbath rest.

A way of life guided by Anabaptist values of nonviolence and radical reconciliation.

TiLT is grounded in the deep "peace church" tradition of Mennonites, Amish, Quakers, and others who seek to live discipleship lives of reconciliation, simplicity, and justice making. This movement, while imperfect, has for 500 years embodied non-violent alternatives to the coercion, retribution, and exploitation that runs rampant through our society. TiLT is supported by Albuquerque Mennonite Church, as well as Mountain States Mennonite Conference, a regional Anabaptist organization.

A way of life dedicated to watershed discipleship.

We will not save a place we do not love; we cannot love a place we do not know. Considering our watershed to be our teacher, corrector, and sustainer, we become ecologically literate and practice sustainable re-inhabitory actions as we learn to be citizens of a specific place once again, our lives shaped by the bounty and the healthy limits of our region.

A way of life defined by Sabbath Economics.

Under God's "Great Economy," abundant personal finances are not to be hoarded and protected, but rather are gifts to be used for the common good. Together, in the face of dominant culture obsessed with accumulation, we seek to practice a 'theology of relinquishment' that includes community investment, relational tithing, mutual aid, micro-loans, and jubilee redistribution.

TiLT seeks to be a parallel society existing within the dominant consumer culture of North America. living out very different values. As modern followers of the Jesus Way living amidst attitudes of alienation, scarcity, selfishness, and fear, we seek to embody:

TiLT House bedroom nicho with St. Francis statue

The "Way" of TiLT

Copyright © 2015

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